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New Immigrants and the Radicalization of American Labor, 1914-1924 (Paperback) (Thomas Mackaman)

New Immigrants and the Radicalization of American Labor, 1914-1924 (Paperback) (Thomas Mackaman) - image 1 of 1

About this item

Through a study of iron mining in Minnesota, steel milling in the Calumet district of the south Chicago area, and coal mining in central Illinois, this book describes how new immigrant workers changed American industrial society from 1914 to 1924. It explains how by 1914, new immigrants from Europe dominated dirty and dangerous jobs in these industries and played a key role in changes to the working class, organized labor, industry, politics, and culture. In the 1920s, government and industry, as well as US nationalist organizations, reacted against the immigrant labor militancy and radicalism, such as union organization, strikes, labor marches, bread riots, and clashes with strike-breakers, private security forces, and police, as well as ideological formations like the Socialist Party, the Industrial Workers of the World, and the communist parties that formed the basis of workers' class interests. This led to the passing of the Johnson-Reed Act, or National Origins Act, of 1924 and the banning of Eastern and Southern European immigration. The book also analyzes the role of World War I and the Russian Revolution. Annotation ©2017 Ringgold, Inc., Portland, OR (protoview.com)
Number of Pages: 212
Genre: History, Social Science, Business + Money Management
Sub-Genre: History
Format: Paperback
Publisher: McFarland Publishing
Author: Thomas Mackaman
Language: English
Street Date: December 15, 2016
TCIN: 50781540
UPC: 9781476662497
Item Number (DPCI): 248-11-1424
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$35.00

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