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Scotland, Empire and Decolonisation in the Twentieth Century (Hardcover)

Scotland, Empire and Decolonisation in the Twentieth Century (Hardcover) - image 1 of 1

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This volume represents one of the first attempts to examine the connection between Scotland and the British empire throughout the entire twentieth century. As the century dawned, the Scottish economy was still strongly connected with imperial infrastructures (like railways, engineering, construction and shipping), and colonial trade and investment. By the end of the century, however, the Scottish economy, its politics, and its society had been through major upheavals which many connected with decolonisation. As the British Empire moved into its final phase during mid-century, the speed of economic change, of military activity, of the formulation of ideas - and their political effects - accelerated. These were reflected in press reactions to imperial events, in the image and status of a military embroiled in the campaigns of the 'imperial end game', in the concluding acts of migratory activity, in identity formations (both at home and in the empire itself), the re-evaluation of Scottish heroic figures, as well as approaches to Scottish politics. Moreover, although it is often thought that the British underwent few of the traumas of decolonisation experienced, for example, by the French, still the end of empire influenced events at home - even in ways that prove quite different from those expected. Written by scholars of distinction, these chapters represent ground-breaking research in the field of Scotland's complex and often-changing relationship with the British empire in the period. The introduction that opens the collection will be viewed for years to come as the single-most important historiographical statement on Scotland and empire during the tumultuous years of the twentieth century.
This volume represents one of the first attempts to examine the connection between Scotland and the British empire throughout the entire twentieth century. As the century dawned, the Scottish economy was still strongly connected with imperial infrastructures (like railways, engineering, construction and shipping), and colonial trade and investment. By the end of the century, however, the Scottish economy, its politics, and its society had been through major upheavals which many connected with decolonisation. As the British Empire moved into its final phase during mid-century, the speed of economic change, of military activity, of the formulation of ideas - and their political effects - accelerated. These were reflected in press reactions to imperial events, in the image and status of a military embroiled in the campaigns of the 'imperial end game', in the concluding acts of migratory activity, in identity formations (both at home and in the empire itself), the re-evaluation of Scottish heroic figures, as well as approaches to Scottish politics. Moreover, although it is often thought that the British underwent few of the traumas of decolonisation experienced, for example, by the French, still the end of empire influenced events at home - even in ways that prove quite different from those expected.

Written by scholars of distinction, these chapters represent ground-breaking research in the field of Scotland's complex and often-changing relationship with the British empire in the period. The introduction that opens the collection will be viewed for years to come as the single-most important historiographical statement on Scotland and empire during the tumultuous years of the twentieth century.
Number of Pages: 231
Genre: History
Series Title: Studies in Imperialism
Format: Hardcover
Publisher: Manchester Univ Pr
Language: English
Street Date: September 1, 2015
TCIN: 24003585
UPC: 9780719096174
Item Number (DPCI): 247-50-9612

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