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The Color of Compromise - by Jemar Tisby (Hardcover)

The Color of Compromise - by  Jemar Tisby (Hardcover) - image 1 of 1
The Color of Compromise - by  Jemar Tisby (Hardcover) - image 1 of 1
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About this item

Specifications

Number of Pages: 256

Genre: Religion + Beliefs

Format: Hardcover

Publisher: Zondervan

Book theme: Social Issues

Author: Jemar Tisby

Language: English

Street Date: January 22, 2019
TCIN: 53920763
UPC: 9780310597261
Item Number (DPCI): 248-10-7887

Description

An acclaimed, timely narrative of how people of faith have historically--up to the present day--worked against racial justice. And a call for urgent action by all Christians today in response.

The Color of Compromise is both enlightening and compelling, telling a history we either ignore or just don't know. Equal parts painful and inspirational, it details how the American church has helped create and maintain racist ideas and practices. You will be guided in thinking through concrete solutions for improved race relations and a racially inclusive church.

The Color of Compromise

  • Takes you on a historical, sociological, and religious journey: from America's early colonial days through slavery and the Civil War
  • Covers the tragedy of Jim Crow laws, the victories of the Civil Rights era, and the strides of today's Black Lives Matter movement
  • Reveals the cultural and institutional tables we have to flip in order to bring about meaningful integration
  • Charts a path forward to replace established patterns and systems of complicity with bold, courageous, immediate action
  • Is a perfect book for pastors and other faith leaders, students, non-students, book clubs, small group studies, history lovers, and all lifelong learners

The Color of Compromise is not a call to shame or a platform to blame white evangelical Christians. It is a call from a place of love and desire to fight for a more racially unified church that no longer compromises what the Bible teaches about human dignity and equality. A call that challenges black and white Christians alike to standup now and begin implementing the concrete ways Tisby outlines, all for a more equitable and inclusive environment among God's people. Starting today.

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Guest Ratings & Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars with 6 reviews
100% would recommend
5 recommendations

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We Need To Know Our History To Understand Our Present

5 out of 5 stars
Would recommend
Drelia - 11 months ago
This is an extremely important work coming out at just the right time. Tisby has accomplished a historical survey that will help the reader from every point of learning about racism in the United States. Whether you're just starting to learn or are further on the journey, The Color of Compromise will open your eyes to the patterns of racism throughout this nation's history. Each chapter takes the reader through a different time period when the American Church was given a choice, to further the cultivation of racism or to undo the sins of previous generations. While at times painful and disheartening to read, there is also hope in this book because as Christians, we follow a God who cares deeply about the sins of racism and white supremacy, who desires repentance and healing, and who doesn't turn away from the cries of the oppressed. Tisby gives the reader great practical steps to take once they've made it from Colonial times to the modern day. The book leaves you wanting to do something, and it's greatly appreciated that Tisby encourages the reader to dig deeper.
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It Didn't Have to be This Way

5 out of 5 stars
Would recommend
Nicki - 12 months ago
It didn't have to be this way. This is the truth that echoed through the chambers of my mind. In The Color of Compromise, Jemar Tisby provides a haunting historical account of the church’s complicity in racism in this country. Our history as a nation could be different if those in power had made intentional decisions to honor the image of God in all people. “Throughout this journey several themes dot the horizon of history. One notable theme is that white supremacy in the nation and the church was not inevitable" (p. 8). “This book says, ‘Don’t look away.’ Don’t look away from Christians using the Bible to justify the inferiority of African people. Don’t look away from the political cowardice Christians displayed when they could have changed the laws of the land. Don’t look away from the nation’s bloodiest war, which was fought over the issue of human bondage, and the many Christians who risked their lives to preserve it. Don’t look away from members in good standing in Christian congregations donning the white hoods of the Ku Klux Klan and terrorizing black citizens. Don’t look away from the horror of the American church when it comes to race” (p. 11). This book is unique in that it speaks to Christians and sketches a broader narrative that encompasses a more complete history, connects seemingly disconnected facts, and illustrates a logical progression of past events to the present. One of the most striking evolutions I read about was the pro-life movement, which has racist roots from the Religious Right emerging to oppose the ruling of Brown v. Board of Education. Unconfessed sin naturally changes, usually becoming more subtle and difficult to detect, and Tisby does not shrink back from examining and diagnosing the ways the sin of racism has morphed and continues to infiltrate the institutions of this nation, especially the institution of the church. Tisby confirms through his writing that silence is not spiritual and calls Christians to live courageously in fighting the sin of racism. Another lesson that surfaced for me through my reading is that it is not enough to not be racist. Rather, I must be actively and intentionally antiracist in following the biblical pattern of “putting off and putting on” described in scripture. It takes humility to admit being influenced by a racialized society, but it takes humility coupled with valor to oppose a racialized society and push a culture toward a more full realization of “Your Kingdom come…on earth as it is in Heaven.” “Progress is possible, but we must learn to discern the difference between complicit Christianity and courageous Christianity. Complicit Christianity forfeits its integrity by worshiping the idol of whiteness. Such Christianity has lost its moral authority by devaluing the image of God in people of African descent…By contrast, courageous Christianity embraces racial and ethnic diversity. It stands against any person, policy, or practice that would dim the glory of God reflected in the life of every human being. These words are a call to abandon complicit Christianity and move toward courageous Christianity” (pp. 16-17). I believe all people would benefit from reading this book, though not all people will appreciate the truth this book conveys. I will continue recommending it to others, particularly those interested in learning a broader history of racism, the effects of this egregious sin, and how to be part of solutions that repair the damage done by racism, for reparation must accompany true repentance, as evidenced by Zacchaeus. I think every person who claims to be a Christian should wrestle with the realities laid out in the pages of this book and lived out in the world around us.
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Real

5 out of 5 stars
Would recommend
David - 12 months ago
It's raw. It's real. It's researched. It's not a bomb lobbed from a liberal bubble. It's an exhortation given from an intimate family member. It doesn't fit into a political category, yet it is full of conviction and application that is not afraid of being political. The American church needs discipleship on engaging politics and dealing with its power, and this is required reading to that end. The racism it focuses on is anti-black, not to the exclusion of other types of racism, but as a blueprint from which other forms of racism in the U.S. can be understood. It focuses on the American church, not to bash it, but to acknowledge its role in shaping American life, law, and social norms. It's a heavy book, and part of that heaviness is due to the unflinching sober tone its written in. It's not for the faint of heart, but it is written with hope. You can read straight it through. You can study it as history. You can also use it as a resource if you want tips to for doing justice. I think people will reference it for a long time. Thank you, Jemar.
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Necessary Read for Future Change

5 out of 5 stars
Would recommend
Katie Ward - 12 months ago
In The Color of Compromise: The Truth about the American Church's Complicity in Racism Jemar Tisby uses a historical survey to show the American Church's complicity in racism from the Colonial Era to present day. With almost 400 footnotes, he provides example after example of the Church's direct involvement (or purposeful silence) in slavery and racist acts. I'm impressed by the accessibility of this book; Tisby does not use complex academic language. While the language was easy to understand, I had to take several breaks due to the heaviness of the topic. The Color of Compromise does not paint a pretty picture rather it is “about telling the truth so that reconciliation—robust, consistent, honest reconciliation—might occur across racial lines” (p. 3). Before we as the Church can move forward towards racial reconciliation, we must recognize the systems created and carried out to this day by our institution. While some systems are obvious, it is important to note, “an honest assessment of racism should acknowledge that racism never fully goes away, it just adapts to changing times and contexts” (p. 189). In addition, I appreciate the historical context provided by this book, as well as the practical suggestions discussed in the final chapter on what we can do today in regards to racial injustice. *Note: I received an Advanced Reader's Copy
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A careful and thoughtful review of American Christianity

5 out of 5 stars
Would recommend
stephenmatlock - 1 year ago
This is perhaps one of the most accessible, clear, and gentle book you might read about the history of, and acceptance of, white supremacy and black abasement of the American nation and in the American church. Tisby is an historian and does not shave meaning or impact by using soft words. When you read this, you understand what he is saying, directly: racism in the American church was, and is, a deliberate choice. Nothing that has happened so far had to happen. But the good news is that our American nation and our American church can be changed by the actions of interested and committed people. I would expect that some people might feel this book is personally distasteful or even animated against them--"We are good people. Why do we get told that we're racist?" Tisby is not attacking. He is describing, carefully, what it means to be American, to be Christian, and to be racist, and how the third leg of this stool does not need to remain unchanged. It is possible to be American and Christian AND to be committed to social justice and racial equality. I imagine it might be hard to read for some people--and I'm one of those people. It is never fun to look into the mirror and see the flaws. But, it is delightful to see the flaws and then to see ways to remove those flaws and become more just, more fair, more equal, and more loving. Note: while I received an advance copy to read for this review, I've also purchased multiple copies to give to my friends. Pick this up, and spend some time reading.
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