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Writing Modern Ireland (Hardcover)

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Writing Modern Ireland examines the complex literary manifestations of Ireland and Irishness from the turn of the twentieth century to very recently. Together with examinations of the nation, the collected essays consider Irish identities that may be sexual, racial, regional, gendered, disabled and able-bodied, traumatized and in the process of healing. Identity, like literary texts, is a constant process of making and remaking, revision and publication. This collection takes up the question of what it means to write modern Ireland, evoking the many resonances that name will carry: a mythic place, a land controlled from elsewhere, a nation hoped for and achieved, a nation denied and resisted, an island divided, an idea soaked in fantasies and dreams, a homeland abandoned in searches for brighter futures, a land of opportunity, a people who are many people, and a place defined by writers who both empower and challenge it. W. B. Yeats looms large, as he does in modern Irish writing, and in commemoration of his sesquicentennial year. Building on a themed issue of The South Carolina Review, the present volume is expanded and rededicated by Catherine E. Paul (Clemson University). It features critical essays by Ronald Schuchard on Yeats, Michael Sidnell on Beckett, Liam Harte on Sebastian Barry, Jefferson Holdridge on contemporary Irish poets, and Thomas Dillon Redshaw on the revival of the Cuala Press (illustrated), together with a host of significant scholarship and criticism by 14 additional international experts from the USA, UK, Belgium, France, and (of course) Ireland.
This volume takes up the questions of what it means to write modern Ireland, and of what "modern Ireland" even means. Shall we imagine Ireland as a nation, or as an island for which the issue of nationhood has been contentious at least, and perhaps even traumatic? By referring to "Ireland" in the title, we evoke the many resonances that that name and the place(s) associated with it carry: a mythic place, a land controlled from elsewhere, a nation hoped for and achieved. a nation denied and resisted, an island divided, an idea soaked in fantasies and dreams, a homeland abandoned in searches for brighter futures, a land of opportunity, a people who are many people. And most of all, it is a place defined and expanded by writers whose literary imaginings give it power and simultaneously challenge it. The idea of Irishness for early twentieth-century writers has been much discussed, and whether we think of Ireland as a net beyond which an aspiring artist must fly, as a nation whose founding can be aided by the collection of folk tales, or as a cultural identity to which artists and presses can contribute, the act of writing Ireland has been a long preoccupation.
Number of Pages: 268
Genre: Literary Criticism
Sub-Genre: European / English + Irish + Scottish + Welsh
Series Title: Ireland in the Arts and Humanities Lup
Format: Hardcover
Publisher: Liverpool Univ Pr
Language: English
Street Date: September 1, 2015
TCIN: 46777944
UPC: 9780989082693
Item Number (DPCI): 247-52-1347

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